Did you know…?

  • Harriet Tubman UGRR Web Site Release

    WEST CHESTER, PA (June 12, 2024) – The Brandywine Valley Scenic Byway Commission is delighted to announce the completion of a website for the Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad Byway (www.harriettubmanbywaypa.com). As the only new Byway in Pennsylvania in decades, the Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad Byway was officially designated in 2022 to tell the important story of the Underground Railroad in Chester County, located “just over the line,” from states that allowed enslavement. In addition to commemorating the manifest courage of Harriet Tubman and her important work, the website also encompasses ten very moving stories about the Underground Railroad in Chester County prior to the Civil War and features key locations related to the Underground Railroad in the area.
    According to Rich Phifer, Chair of the Brandywine Valley Scenic Byway Commission, the new website is a big step forward in promoting the significance of the Tubman Byway and Chester County’s legacy in the Underground Railroad. Accessing the website, every resident of Chester County can learn something new about how courageous residents in their own backyard were part of the effort to assist hundreds of enslaved people. “You come to realize,” Mr. Phifer said, “that Chester County played a very significant role in the lives of thousands of freedom seekers as they sought to escape bondage. I highly recommend that anyone interested in our area and local history check out the Tubman Byway website and then visit sites that are of interest. There is so much to learn and see!”
    The Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad Byway in Pennsylvania is managed by the Brandywine Valley Scenic Byway Commission, made up of a coalition of the townships through which the Byway passes, that also manages the Brandywine Valley National Scenic Byway. The new website was made possible in part through a grant from the Pennsylvania Department of Community and Economic Development’s Marketing to Attract Tourists grant program. Technical support and development of the website was provided by the National Travel Center of Lancaster, PA.
    * The PENNSYLVANIA BYWAYS logo is and remains the intellectual property of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania
    and is being used with the express written permission of the Department of Transportation.
    In view of the increasing demand for heritage and cultural tourism in the United States, where visitors want to learn the authentic stories of the places they visit, Pennsylvania and Chester County have an opportunity to elevate the profile of the Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad Byway and its story in the eyes of the nation. According to Dr. Maree Forbes Gaughan, Managing Director of the National Travel Center, the website will ultimately also serve as the information point for the Underground Railroad Heritage Interpretive Trail currently being developed by the Brandywine Valley Scenic Byway Commission and Chester County PA 250 Path to Freedom to reveal the comprehensive collection of locations related to the Underground Railroad throughout Chester County in time for the nation’s 250th anniversary in 2026. “The trail will further emphasize the importance of the Underground Railroad in Chester County and the magnitude of the activity that took place “just over the line” in Pennsylvania.”
    For additional information, contact Rich Phifer at 610-436-5108, ext. 108, or send an e-mail to rphifer@eastbradford.org. Visit the website at: https://www.harriettubmanbywaypa.com.
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  • Pocopson Township Formed from Three Townships

    Pocopson Township was formed from Pennsbury, East Marlborough, and West Bradford Township land.  In late 1848, 28 male residents from these Townships, along with Newlin, signed a petition to the Court of Quarter Sessions.  Eusebius Barnard, Pocopson’’s future Underground Railroad leader, was among these men.

  • Pocaupsing

    The Indian name for Pocopson Creek was POCAUPSING, which meant roaring waters.

    Source: A History of Pocopson Township by Alta Baily Bittle
  • Low Population Density

    At 255 persons per square mile, the population density of Pocopson is lower than all adjacent townships except Newlin.

    Source: 2010 Census; US Census Bureau.

  • Pocopson train station

    In 1906, the Bell Telephone Company installed one of the first pay telephone stations at the Pocopson train station.

    Source: A History of Pocopson Township by Alta Baily Bittle
  • Industrial land

    Less than 1% of Pocopson Township (13 acres) is zoned for industrial use.

    Source: 2014 Pocopson Township Comprehensive Plan
  • Public parks and recreation

    932 acres (17% of Pocopson Township) is restricted to open space and parks. Public park and recreation areas include Pocopson Park (Locust Grove and Corrine Roads, N. Wawaset and Corrine Roads), Pocopson Creek Park (1440 Lenape Road, next to the Public Works Garage), and Wawaset Road Park (behind the Barnard House and opposite Pocopson Home).

    Source: 2014 Pocopson Township Comprehensive Plan
  • Institutional land

    Pocopson has modest institutional land use. 296 acres (6% of the Township) are zoned institutional.

    Source: 2014 Pocopson Township Comprehensive Plan
  • Lenape Forge

    Lenape Forged Products, Inc. occupies the building originally built by the West Chester Street Railway to run electric trolleys from West Chester to Kennett Square.

    Source: A History of Pocopson Township by Alta Baily Bittle
  • Agricultural land

    Agricultural land use represents 25% of Pocopson Township. That’s 1,356 acres of farmland.

    Source: 2014 Pocopson Township Comprehensive Plan
  • Residential land use

    Single Family residential land use represents 36% of Pocopson Township. That’s 1,936 acres.

    Source: 2014 Pocopson Township Comprehensive Plan
  • Population

    Pocopson Township’s population is 3,392 as of 2010.*

    Source: 2010 Census; US Census Bureau. *Not including the residents of Pocopson Home or the Chester County Prison
  • Road Info

    Pocopson Township has an area of 8.4 square miles. Within the township there is a total of 41.9 miles of roadway. 13 miles of that are owned and maintained by PennDOT, with the remainder being owned and maintained by Pocopson Township.

    Source: 2014 Pocopson Township Comprehensive Plan
  • The Battle of Brandywine

    The area of Pocopson Township played a central role in The Battle of Brandywine on September 11, 1777.  See animated map of British troop movements.

    Source: Brandywine Battlefield Preservation Plan 2013: Chester County Planning Commission